Alberta Canada Adoption Record Information

By DD / July 3, 2016
Alberta Canada Adoption Informati

Alberta Canada Adoption Record Information

If you were born in Canada and are looking for your birth family or you gave a child up for adoption in Canada, you will need to look at the information listed for the province that the adoption took place in.

If the adoption took place in Alberta, there is a great website with information, the Alberta Post Adoption Registry.
http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/adoption/14846.html

The Alberta Post Adoption Registry maintains the sealed adoption records for all granted adoptions completed in the province of Alberta. This registry program provides reunion services and information to adult adoptees, adoptive parents and birth family members. There are no fees for registry services. There are frequently asked questions, government forms, reunion stories and other information available on this site.
On November 1, 2004, when the Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act came into effect, the Alberta government opened access to identifying information contained in adoption records. This change affects all adoptions granted in the province prior to January 1, 2005, therefore there are two groups of information, depending on when the adopted person was born and adopted.

 

Alberta Canada Adoption Record Information Before 2005

For adoptions granted BEFORE January 1, 2005, birth parents and adult adoptees (18 years of age and older) may obtain identifying information about one another through the submission of a Request for Release of Adoption Information form. Anyone involved who wishs their identifying information to remain confidential must file a Disclosure Veto form with Alberta’s Post Adoption Registry. This veto will prevent the release of identifying information on the birth registration or adoption information; however, non-identifying information is still released to the other party upon request.

Alberta Canada Adoption Record Information After 2005

For adoptions granted AFTER January 1, 2005, birth parents and adoptees can no longer file a disclosure veto. You may file a Contact Preference form. Identifying information about the adult adoptee and the biological parent will be released to these parties when the adoptee turns 18 years of age or older upon submission of a Request for Release of Adoption Information form.

If the person you want to find has registered a veto, you can still receive non-identifying information, which may include: province of birth, marital status, occupation, education level, physical description, and personality, interests of the parent and medical history of the family.
All identifying information relating to the adoptive parents will remain confidential. Birth parents and adult adoptees may only obtain identifying information about one another, unless a disclosure veto is in place prohibiting the release of this information.

Completing a Request for Release form will not reunite you with birth family/biological children. Adult adoptees and/or birth parents may obtain the identifying information contained in the adoption record, if a veto is not on file. Once you have the information, it will be up to you what is done with it. If you decide to make contact, please realize that the other person may or may not be surprised to hear from you.
Adult adoptees and birth parents will have access to both identifying and non-identifying information contained in the adoption record. Non-identifying information may include: province of birth, marital status, occupation, education level, physical description, personality, and interests of the parent(s) and medical history of the family.

The identifying information could include names, ages (date of birth if known) and place of birth. If a disclosure veto is on file, the adult adoptee and birth parent will continue to receive the non-identifying information in the adoption record.

About the author

DD

I found my birth family after 40 years of looking for them. I used DNA tests, software to sort DNA match results, family trees, contacting DNA matches and several website tools. We want to provide you a "one stop shop" with all your resources to help YOU find YOUR family.

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